Blog

IN THE KNOW: AgTech News April 2017

NZ: CHANGING THE FACE OF AGRICULTURE

Dr Rosie Bosworth pens an in-depth essay on the changing face of agriculture as a response to the ‘Agriculture Mafia’; a domination of the industry by major corporations. The Open Agriculture Initiative is one such example of a new era in the industry, with an aim to create the world’s first open-source agricultural technology research lab and ecosystem of food technologies. With plenty more companies hoping to change the face of agriculture through disruptive science, the future looks bright. Read more >>

NZ: HALTER: THE NEXT GENERATION OF DAIRY FARMING

A solar powered GPS tracking cow collar may be the way of the future, thanks to Halter; a start-up company founded by two recent university graduates. The collar is designed to self-herd cows, emitting warning noises when a cow approaches a boundary, as well as sending data to farmers saving time and money. With plenty of investors keen to support the venture, it’s a start-up to watch. Read more >>

NZ: A NEW TOOL FOR MEASURING DROUGHT

An innovative new tool for measuring drought has been developed by The National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA); the first of its kind. The New Zealand Drought Index has been designed to use the latest scientific information to determine a potential drought status in New Zealand. The measuring tool will help define when drought levels will require additional recovery measures. A regularly updated map of New Zealand, is featured on the Drought Monitor website, giving accurate, up-to-date information on current levels of drought. Read more >>

USA: FEEDING AMERICA: A SOLUTION TO THE FOOD WASTAGE PROBLEM?

MealConnect, a recently launched app, is designed to stop food wastage in the U.S., by connecting businesses with excess food stocks with local food banks, charities and meal programs. With a goal to solve hunger in the country by 2025, it’s an ambitious start-up that’s on the right track. The platform is web-based, meaning it could have the potential to expand elsewhere in the world, including New Zealand.