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IN THE KNOW: AgTech News June 2017

NZ: AGCHAT WITH LOGICLABS CROP COUNTER 

Lincoln Hub sat down with Tayah Ryan from Logiclabs to find out more about how their Crop Counter software has provided a specific solution for their customers in the horticulture industry. She believes that in the last 5-10 years there has been a definite change in the ownership structure of orchards – the growers want more information, more analysis and on-site access to enable quick but educated decision making. They also want solutions to help them run their operation more efficiently, and that’s where Crop Counter is hoping to fill the void. Read more >>

 

NZFARMERS NEED TO ADAPT TO NEW TECHNOLOGIES

The key message from many industry experts at this year’s Fieldays event is that New Zealand farmers need to adapt to robotic technology sooner rather than later. The new technology could help solve labour shortages and cut menial tasks for farmers and workers across New Zealand. Read more >>

 

NZNZ SHOULD FOCUS ON MAKING PRODUCTS “NO ONE ELSE DOES”

Lewis Road Creamery have proven that New Zealand’s future lies beyond commodities, and the company’s founder believes that innovating across different dairy categories shows New Zealand’s creative potential hasn’t been fully realised. He believes New Zealand should be focusing on making products no one else does and doing this the best. “Consumers here and worldwide are crying out for quality and authenticity – just look at the prices being paid for organic milk powder.” Read more >>

 

NZSHEEP MILK COULD REPLACE COW MILK

“Sheep milk might still seem a novelty to many in New Zealand, but its qualities are well-recognised around the world, and it is a sought after commodity with room for growth in New Zealand,” says AgResearch scientist Linda Samuelsson. The organisation was working to educate Fieldays attendees on the potential future of milk in New Zealand. Read more >>

 

NZCONSUMERS TO BE THE FOCUS FOR AGRI-FOOD SUCCESS

“Only by the whole industry seeking ways to work collaboratively will the pivot from a producer-focused, volume-based culture to a market-focused, value-based culture be achieved sufficiently quickly to capture the opportunities available to it.” The success of the agri-food sector is dependent on individuals across the industry placing consumers at the centre of everything they do, according to KPMG. Read more >>

 

NZCOMMODITY-BASED PRICING MODEL TO BE REPLACED

New Zealand has developed a reputation for producing premium meat and dairy, and the main challenge facing the industry is to move away from a commodity-based pricing model to one that targets the world’s richest consumers, according to Farming 2020. By focusing on the high value end of the market, Farming 2020 believe generating more profit from each litre of milk or kilo of beef produced will have a far greater impact on the industry. Read more >>

 

NZ: FENCING FUTURE IN NEW ZEALAND COULD SEE… NO FENCES

Stock could soon be kept in check without a wire in sight thanks to new technology being developed in Australia with New Zealand investment partners. The eShepherd technology works by placing a GPS-enabled collar on an animal, “virtually” fencing off an area and training the stock to stay within the boundary. It could help revolutionise the future of fencing in New Zealand, removing the need for traditional fences on farms.  Read more >> 

 

US: PLANT-BASED MEAT ON THE RISE

Annual global sales of plant-based substitute meat have gained 8 percent a year since 2010, to about $2 billion currently, and are growing at twice the rate of processed meat. While alternatives to meat won’t replace the real thing, more companies are investing in the industry, said Kenneth Shea, a food analyst at Bloomberg Intelligence. “Consumers, more and more, think in terms of sustainability,” Shea said. “They’re looking to eat more plants as opposed to red meat due to the perceived health benefits.” Read more >>

 

NZ: GENETICISTS TO FIGHT MYRTLE RUST

Geneticists are hoping to discover genes which could protect manuka trees from myrtle rust. 46 cases of myrtle rust have been recorded in Taranaki, Northland and Bay of Plenty with Ministry of Primary Industry Officials scrambling to prevent it from spreading further. Myrtle rust damages plants in the myrtaceae family, among them pohutukawa, rata, ramarama, manuka, and eucalypts. The critically endangered Bartlett’s rata, of which only 14 trees are found in Northland, could be the first notable mortality if the disease got hold in the region. Read more >>