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IN THE KNOW: AgTech News May 2017

Africa: USING TECHNOLOGY TO ASSIST AFRICAN FARMS

With global food production needing to increase by 70% in just 33 years, productivity on farms needs to increase in order to feed the growing population. In Africa, this challenge is made more difficult with stunted yield potential, deforestation and climate change issues. Yet despite these challenges, many African entrepreneurs are looking into how technology can assist farms to become more productive and increase their output. Read more >>

NZ: REVOLUTIONARY WAY TO BOOST BEE OUTPUT

Using bees’ own wax to create honeycombs may be the answer to helping boost their productivity, and help stop the spread of disease from destroying hives. Ceratech, a Taranaki company started by a local beekeeper and three partners, is hoping to boost output with bees by lessening their time spent creating honeycomb. More time could then be spent foraging for nectar, thus boosting the overall output. Read more >>

NZ: SMALL SCALE MAY BE THE KEY TO FUTURE OF AGRICULTURE

KPMG’s head of agribusiness believes the future of agriculture in Southland will be driven by innovation, not scale. As the global attitudes to food production and consumption evolve, the key focus will be engaging with consumers to get the most value out of products already being produced. Read more >>

Australia: INCREASE IN MANGO CROP MAY HOLD KEY TO SUCCESS

The retail value of the mango crop has increased by 40% in Australia, and the key its success lies in the taste. The game changer had been the rollout of Near Infra-Red (NIR) technology, which enables growers to pinpoint the precise optimum harvest window for their crop, regardless of location or variety. For New Zealand growers of crops, the new technology may be the answer to harvesting fruit and vegetables at the best time for optimum flavour and taste. In the know >>

USA: LAB GROWN SHRIMP LEADS NEW WAVE OF PLANT-BASED FOODS

After the recent success of lab grown burger meat and chicken, it was only a matter of time before seafood became the next successful food group to be replicated in plant form. With extensive environmental issues surrounding the supply of seafood, marine biology major Dominique Barnes felt as though it was the best place to start to bring about sustainable change.  Read more >>